Love Quotes and Sayings
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Charles Dickens Love Quotes and Sayings

Photo credit: Wikipedia, Charles Dickens Quotes and Sayings

Charles Dickens Love Quotes and Sayings

#1 The Old Curiosity Shop, 1841

1. In love of home, the love of country has its rise; and who are the truer patriots or the better in time of need–those who venerate the land, owning its wood, and stream, and earth, and all that they produce? Or those who love their country, boasting not a foot of ground in all its wide domain!

#2 David Copperfield, Chapter 9

2. …a loving heart was better and stronger than wisdom…

#3 Our Mutual Friend

3. And if it’s proud to have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts, she is proud. And if it’s not, she is not.

#4 Master Humphrey’s Clock, 1840, Volume 1

4. To conceal anything from those to whom I am attached, is not in my nature. I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart.

#5 Lucy’s Song in The Village Coquettes, 1836

5. Love is not a feeling to pass away, like the balmy breath of a summer day; it is not — it cannot be — laid aside; it is not a thing to forget or hide.


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Excerpt from Wikipedia: Charles John Huffam Dickens (7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was the most popular English novelist of the Victorian era, and one of the most popular of all time, responsible for some of English literature’s most iconic characters.
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Sayings by Charles Dickens

#1 Great Expectations, Chapter 19

1. Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts. I was better after I had cried, than before — more sorry, more aware of my own ingratitude, more gentle.

#2 A Tale of Two Cities Life, Book I – Recalled to Life, Chapter III – The Night Shadows

2. A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.

#3 A Tale of Two Cities, Chapter 22

3. Nothing that we do, is done in vain. I believe, with all my soul, that we shall see the triumph.

#4 Dombey and Son, Chapter 12

4. Ideas, like ghosts (according to the common notion of ghosts), must be spoken to a little before they will explain themselves…

#5 Martin Chuzzlewit, Chapter 27

5. But charity begins at home, and justice begins next door.

#6 Little Dorrit, Book 1, Chapter 23

6. A person who can’t pay, gets another person who can’t pay, to guarantee that he can pay. Like a person with two wooden legs getting another person with two wooden legs, to guarantee that he has got two natural legs. It don’t make either of them able to do a walking match.

#7 The Pickwick Papers, 1836

7. Happy, happy Christmas, that can win us back to the delusions of our childish days; that can recall to the old man the pleasures of his youth; that can transport the sailor and the traveller, thousands of miles away, back to his own fire-side and his quiet home!

#8-9 David Copperfield, Chapter 42

8. I have been very fortunate in worldly matters; many men have worked much harder, and not succeeded half so well; but I never could have done what I have done, without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one object at a time, no matter how quickly its successor should come upon its heels, which I then formed.

9. My meaning simply is, that whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do well; that whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself to completely; that in great aims and in small, I have always been thoroughly in earnest.

#10 Oliver Twist, Chapter 37

10. It opens the lungs, washes the countenance, exercises the eyes, and softens down the temper, so cry away.

#11 A Tale of Two Cities, Book I – Recalled to Life, Chapter I – The Period

11. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way – in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

#12 Great Expectations, Chapter 40

12. Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There’s no better rule.

#13 Our Mutual Friend

13. No one is useless in this world who lightens the burden of it for any one else.

#14 The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (or Nicholas Nickleby), Chapter 5

14. Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you’ve conquered human nature.

#15-16 Sketches by Boz, 1836-1837

15. Reflect upon your present blessings — of which every man has many — not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some. Fill your glass again, with a merry face and contented heart. Our life on it, but your Christmas shall be merry, and your new year a happy one!

16. The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none; and there’s a consolation even in being able to patch up one difficulty, to make way for another, to which very poor people are strangers.

#17 The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (or Nicholas Nickleby), Chapter 3

17. The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again.

#18 The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (or Nicholas Nickleby), Chapter 22

18. For nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own; and from morning to night, as from the cradle to the grave, is but a succession of changes so gentle and easy, that we can scarcely mark their progress.

#19 The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (or Nicholas Nickleby), Chapter 28

19. Although a skillful flatterer is a most delightful companion if him all to yourself, his taste becomes very doubtful when he takes to complimenting other people.

#20 A Christmas Carol

20. I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach!

#21 The Old Curiosity Shop, 1841, Chapter 56

21. If there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers.

#22 The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club

22. A silent look of affection and regard when all other eyes are turned coldly away – the consciousness that we possess the sympathy and affection of one being when all others have deserted us – is a hold, a stay, a comfort, in the deepest affliction, which no wealth could purchase, or power bestow.

#23 A Christmas Carol, Stave 3: The Second of the Three Spirits

23. It is a fair, even-handed, noble adjustment of things, that, while there is infection in disease and sorrow, there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humour.

#24 SPEECH: COMMERCIAL TRAVELLERS. LONDON, 30 DECEMBER 1854

24. Every traveller has a home of his own, and he learns to appreciate it the more from his wandering.

#25 HARD TIMES, Book 3, Chapter 1: ANOTHER THING NEEDFUL

25. Some persons hold that there is a wisdom of the Head, and that there is a wisdom of the Heart.

#26 David Copperfield, Chapter 12

26. My advice is, never do tomorrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!

#27 Sketches by Boz, Characters – Chapter 1 – THOUGHTS ABOUT PEOPLE

27. It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live and die in London. He awakens no sympathy in the breast of any single person; his existence is a matter of interest to no one save himself; he cannot be said to be forgotten when he dies, for no one remembered him when he was alive.
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Unsourced Charles Dickens Quotes

1. What greater gift than the love of a cat?

2. A man is lucky if he is the first love of a woman. A woman is lucky if she is the last love of a man.
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Books by Charles Dickens

1. A Christmas Carol
2. A Tale of Two Cities
3. Oliver Twist

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