Love Quotes and Sayings
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Robert Burton Love Quotes and Sayings

Robert Burton Love Quotes and Sayings

1. No cord or cable can draw so forcibly, or bind so fast, as love can do with a single thread.

2. Most part of a lover’s life is full of agony, anxiety, fear and grief, complaints, sighs, suspicions, and cares (heigh-ho my heart is woe), full of silence and irksome solitariness.

3. To enlarge or illustrate this power and effect of love is to set a candle in the sun.

4. What is life, when wanting love? Night without a morning; love’s the cloudless summer sun, nature gay adorning.


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Except from Wikipedia: Robert Burton (8 February 1577 – 25 January 1640) was an English scholar at Oxford University, best known for the classic The Anatomy of Melancholy. He was also the incumbent of St Thomas the Martyr, Oxford, and of Segrave in Leicestershire.
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Sayings by Robert Burton

1. A blow with a word strikes deeper than a blow with a sword.

2. A dwarf standing on the shoulders of a giant may see farther than a giant himself.

3. A good conscience is a continual feast.

4. If there be a hell upon earth it is to be found in a melancholy man’s heart.

5. The men who succeed are the efficient few. They are the few who have the ambition and will power to develop themselves.

6. A quiet mind cureth all.

7. Every man hath a good and a bad angel attending on him in particular all his life long.

8. Great feelings will often take the aspect of error, and great faith the aspect of illusion.

9. Like dogs in a wheel, birds in a cage, or squirrels in a chain, ambitious men still climb and climb, with great labor, and incessant anxiety, but never reach the top.

10. One religion is as true as another.

11. Old friends become bitter enemies on a sudden for toys and small offenses.

12. Truth is the shattered mirror strewn in myriad bits; while each believes his little bit the whole to own.

13. How much more cruel the pen may be than the sword.

14. Health indeed is a precious thing, to recover and preserve which we undergo any misery, drink bitter potions, freely give our goods: restore a man to his health, his purse lies open to thee.